A dynasty trust keeps on giving long into the future

With a properly executed estate plan, your wealth can be enjoyed by your children and even their children. But did you know that by using a dynasty trust you can extend the estate tax benefits for several generations, and perhaps indefinitely? A dynasty trust can protect your wealth from gift, estate and generation-skipping transfer (GST) taxes and help you leave a lasting legacy.

Dynasty trust in action

Transfers that skip a generation — such as gifts or bequests to grandchildren or other individuals two or more generations below you, as well as certain trust distributions — are generally considered to be GSTs and subject to the GST tax (on top of any applicable gift or estate tax). However, you can make GSTs up to the $5.49 million (in 2017) GST exemption free of GST tax.

Your contributions to a dynasty trust will be considered taxable gifts, but you can minimize or avoid gift taxes by applying your lifetime gift tax exemption — also $5.49 million in 2017.

After you fund the trust, the assets can grow and compound indefinitely. The trust makes distributions to your children, grandchildren and future descendants according to criteria you establish. So long as your beneficiaries don’t gain control over the trust, the undistributed assets will bypass their taxable estates.

Enhancing the benefits

To increase the benefit to future generations, you can structure the trust as a grantor trust so that you pay any taxes on the trust’s income. The assets will then be free to grow without being eroded by taxes (at least during your lifetime).

Also consider further leveraging your GST tax exemption by funding the dynasty trust with life insurance policies or property that’s expected to appreciate significantly in value. So long as your exemptions cover the value of your contributions, any future growth will be sheltered from GST tax, as well as gift and estate tax.

Is a dynasty trust right for you?

If establishing a lasting legacy is an estate planning goal, a dynasty trust may be the right vehicle for you. Even if an estate and GST tax repeal is passed as part of the GOP’s proposed tax reform legislation, the repeal might be only temporary. So this planning technique could still make sense. Before you take action, consult with us, because a dynasty trust can be complicated to set up. We’ll also keep you apprised of any legislative news regarding an estate and GST tax repeal.

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Who should own your life insurance policy?

If you own life insurance policies at your death, the proceeds will be included in your taxable estate. Ownership is usually determined by several factors, including who has the right to name the beneficiaries of the proceeds. The way around this problem is to not own the policies when you die. However, don’t automatically rule out your ownership either.

And it’s important to keep in mind the current uncertain future of the estate tax. If the estate tax is repealed (or if someone doesn’t have a large enough estate that estate taxes are a concern), then the inclusion of your policy in your estate is a nonissue. However, there may be nontax reasons for not owning the policy yourself.

Plus and minuses of different owners

To choose the best owner, consider why you want the insurance. Do you want to replace income? Provide liquidity? Or transfer wealth to your heirs? And how important are tax implications, flexibility, control, and cost and ease of administration? Let’s take a closer look at four types of owners:

  1. You or your spouse. There are several nontax benefits to your ownership, primarily relating to flexibility and control. The biggest drawback is estate tax risk. Ownership by you or your spouse generally works best when your combined assets, including insurance, won’t place either of your estates into a taxable situation.
  2. Your children. Ownership by your children works best when your primary goal is to pass wealth to them. On the plus side, proceeds aren’t subject to estate tax on your or your spouse’s death, and your children receive all of the proceeds tax-free. On the minus side, policy proceeds are paid to your children outright. This may not be in accordance with your estate plan objectives and may be especially problematic if a child has creditor problems.
  3. Your business. Company ownership or sponsorship of insurance on your life can work well when you have cash flow concerns related to paying premiums. Company sponsorship can allow premiums to be paid in part or in whole by the business under a split-dollar arrangement. But if you’re the controlling shareholder of the company and the proceeds are payable to a beneficiary other than the business, the proceeds could be included in your estate for estate tax purposes.
  4. An ILIT. A properly structured irrevocable life insurance trust (ILIT) could save you estate taxes on any insurance proceeds. The trust owns the policy and pays the premiums. When you die, the proceeds pass into the trust and aren’t included in your estate. The trust can be structured to provide benefits to your surviving spouse and/or other beneficiaries.

Contact us with any questions.

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A Crummey trust can preserve the annual gift tax exclusion

Traditionally, taxpayers have looked for ways to make the most of the $14,000 annual gift tax exclusion, and using a Crummey trust is one way to do that. But with the federal gift and estate tax exemption currently at an inflation-adjusted $5.49 million and the possibility of an estate tax repeal, it may seem that the annual exclusion is less relevant than ever before. Or is it?

Gift and estate tax law uncertainty

Although an estate tax repeal is called for under the “Unified Framework for Fixing Our Broken Tax Code” released by President Trump and congressional Republicans on September 27, there’s no guarantee that legislation including the repeal will be passed. Even if it is, the repeal could be temporary and the estate tax could return in the future. And notably absent from the framework is any mention of a gift tax repeal.

So affluent people whose estates exceed the exemption amount need to continue to seek strategies for minimizing gift and estate taxes. And even those with more modest estates may want to take advantage of the annual exclusion to shelter assets against potential future changes in their wealth and federal estate tax laws. That’s why a Crummey trust may be worth a look.

Convert a future interest into a present interest

The annual exclusion is limited to gifts of a “present interest,” defined by IRS regulations as “an unrestricted right to the immediate use, possession, or enjoyment of property or the income from property.”

But what about gifts to a trust designed to distribute assets to your children or other beneficiaries at a future date? Certain types of trusts satisfy the present interest requirement, but only if the trust distributes all of its income currently or, in the case of a trust set up for a minor, distributes all of the principal and income to the beneficiary at age 21.

A Crummey trust satisfies the present interest requirement by giving beneficiaries the right to withdraw trust contributions for a limited period of time (typically 30 days after the contribution is made). To ensure that these withdrawal rights are treated as present interests, they must be real rights with economic substance, rather than a mere paper formality.

In addition, there can be no agreement with the beneficiaries — express or implied — that they won’t exercise their withdrawal rights.

If you want to make annual exclusion gifts to loved ones but retain some control over when they use the gifted assets, a Crummey trust may be right for you. But before you set one up, be sure you understand the gift, estate and income tax implications. We can help you determine if a Crummey trust is right for your estate plan.

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In estate planning be aware of fraudulent transfer laws

A primary goal of your estate plan is to transfer wealth to your family according to your wishes and at the lowest possible tax cost. However, if you have creditors, be aware of fraudulent transfer laws. In a nutshell, if your creditors challenge your gifts, trusts or other strategies as fraudulent transfers, they can quickly undo your estate plan.

2 fraud types

Most states have adopted the Uniform Fraudulent Transfer Act (UFTA). The act allows creditors to challenge transfers involving two types of fraud that you should be mindful of as you weigh your estate planning options:

  1. Actual fraud. This means making a transfer or incurring an obligation “with actual intent to hinder, delay or defraud any creditor,” including current creditors and probable future creditors.

Just because you weren’t purposefully trying to defraud creditors doesn’t mean you’re safe from an actual fraud challenge. Because a court can’t read your mind, it will consider the surrounding facts and circumstances to determine whether a transfer involves fraudulent intent. So before you make gifts or place assets in a trust, consider how a court might view the transfer.

  1. Constructive fraud. This is a more significant risk for most people because it doesn’t involve intent to defraud. Under UFTA, a transfer or obligation is constructively fraudulent if you made it without receiving a reasonably equivalent value in exchange for the transfer or obligation and you either were insolvent at the time or became insolvent as a result of the transfer or obligation.

“Insolvent” means that the sum of your debts is greater than all of your assets, at a fair valuation. You’re presumed to be insolvent if you’re not paying your debts as they become due.

Generally, the constructive fraud rules protect only present creditors — that is, creditors whose claims arose before the transfer was made or the obligation was incurred.

Know your net worth

By definition, when you make a gift — either outright or in trust — you don’t receive reasonably equivalent value in exchange. So if you’re insolvent at the time, or the gift renders you insolvent, you’ve made a constructively fraudulent transfer, which means a creditor could potentially undo the transfer.

To avoid this risk, analyze your net worth before making substantial gifts. Even if you’re not having trouble paying your debts, it’s possible to meet the technical definition of insolvency.

Fraudulent transfer laws vary from state to state, so consult an attorney about the law in your specific state.

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Are your retirement savings secure from creditors?

A primary goal of estate planning is asset protection. After all, no matter how well your estate plan is designed, it won’t do much good if you wind up with no wealth to share with your family.

If you have significant assets in employer-sponsored retirement plans or IRAs, it’s important to understand the extent to which those assets are protected against creditors’ claims and, if possible, to take steps to strengthen that protection.

Employer plans

Most qualified plans — such as pension, profit-sharing and 401(k) plans — are protected against creditors’ claims, both in and out of bankruptcy, by the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA). This protection also extends to 403(b) and 457 plans.

IRA-based employer plans — such as Simplified Employee Pension (SEP) plans and Savings Incentive Match Plans for Employees (SIMPLE) IRAs — are also protected in bankruptcy. But there’s some uncertainty over whether they’re protected outside of bankruptcy.

IRAs

The level of asset protection available for IRAs depends in part on whether the owner is involved in bankruptcy proceedings. In a bankruptcy context, creditor protection is governed by federal law. Under the Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act (BAPCPA), both traditional and Roth IRAs are exempt from creditors’ claims up to an inflation-adjusted $1 million.

The IRA limit doesn’t, however, apply to amounts rolled over from a qualified plan or a 403(b) or 457 plan — or to any earnings on those amounts. Suppose, for example, that you have $4 million invested in a 401(k) plan. If you roll it over into an IRA, the entire $4 million, plus all future earnings, will generally continue to be exempt from creditors’ claims in bankruptcy.

To ensure that rollover amounts are fully protected, keep those funds in separate IRAs rather than commingling them with any contributory IRAs you might own. Also, make sure the rollover is fully documented and the word “rollover” is part of its name. Bear in mind, too, that once a distribution is made from the IRA, it’s no longer protected.

Outside bankruptcy, the protection afforded an IRA depends on state law.

What about inherited IRAs?

In 2014, the U.S. Supreme Court held that inherited IRAs do not qualify as retirement accounts under bankruptcy law. The Court reasoned that money in an IRA retirement account was set aside “at some prior date by an entirely different person.” But after an inheritance, it no longer bears the legal characteristics of retirement funds because the heir can withdraw funds at any time without a tax penalty and take other steps not required with non-inherited IRAs. Therefore, they’re not protected in bankruptcy. (Clark v. Rameker)

Consult with your attorney about protection for retirement accounts in a nonbankruptcy context.

Protect yourself

If you’re concerned that your retirement savings are vulnerable to creditors’ claims, please contact us. The effectiveness of these strategies depends on factors such as whether future creditor claims arise in bankruptcy and what state law applies.

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